Month: March 2016

GETTING YOUR CHILD TO WIPE HIS/HER OWN BUTT

Teaching kids to wipe their butts effectively is a common parenting struggle. It’s a topic that is never brought up to me (I think due to embarrassment), but one I bring up daily. Often in the well child exam, I will discover poop all over the child’s butt, skids in the underwear, mom is horrified, and the child is oblivious. It is usually in the 4-10 year-old range. In the younger ages, mom is usually still wiping the child’s butt. When I discover the problem, I respond with: “(child’s name)…you aren’t doing a good enough job wiping your bum....

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SEASONAL ALLERGIES: THE RUNNY NOSE AND ITCHY EYES

I noticed just this week that I am beginning to see a bump in the number of kids coming into my office with seasonal allergies. Seasonal allergies can range from a slight nuisance to completely miserable. Allergies can cause a runny, itchy nose, watery eyes, and sneezing. Since allergies tend to have a genetic component, be on alert for symptoms in children if either parent suffers from allergies. How does my doctor know if my child has allergies? Your doctor will ask lots of questions about your child’s symptoms, triggers, and environmental influences. She will determine if the story...

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POISON CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Did you know that there is an annual National Poison Prevention Week? It is always the third week in March. In honor of the week, I thought today’s post should be on poisonings. Fast facts: More than a million American children under the age of 6 suffer from poisoning annually. More than 90% of poisonings happen at home with household goods. Poison Control can be reached 24/7 at 1-800-222-1222 by anyone. Doctors (whether in the ER, office, or on call) use poison control as a resource to manage patients with poisoning. Kind of nice to know you have direct access to...

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10 THINGS YOU SHOULD HAVE IN YOUR MEDICINE CABINET

Everyone should have a few common, key items in their medicine cabinet. These few items should help in a pinch, and save you from making trips to the store in the middle of the night. Here are the must haves to any medicine cabinet: Tylenol (generic is acetaminophen). You can buy the children’s or infant formula; they are the same concentration. The only difference is whether it comes with a cup (children’s) or syringe (infant) to dose. For the same cost, you get more out of the children’s version. Use Tylenol for fever and/or pain. There is no anti-inflammatory effect,...

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WHEN TO GO TO THE ER vs. INSTACARE vs. OFFICE VISIT

Have you ever gone to Instacare/Urgent Care only to be sent to the Emergency Room (ER)? Have you ever spent 8 hours waiting in the ER for an ear infection? One of the challenges of parenthood is knowing where to go when something goes wrong with your child. Generally speaking, as you go from office, to Instacare/Urgent Care, to ER, you increase the cost of the visit and the time spent. Here’s a quick guide on when to go where: The office Nearly all problems should go to the doctor’s office (when available). Almost all infections, sicknesses, rashes, behavioral...

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Dr. Monica Wonnacott


I'm a pediatrician and a mom. PediatricAnswers.com is my blog where parents can get the straight scoop on their child's health, largely based on my experience in the office and at home. I don't diagnose on the site, so please don't ask. These are just my opinions. Use this site as a resource. And trust your parent gut.

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